Why do we need to dedicate funds to these areas?

Colorado is one of the fastest growing states with one of the best economies in the country. Yet each year we cut vital funding for education and transportation, and continue to underfund mental health and senior services. Budgets for essential public services are slashed during bad economic times and are not ever restored during good economic times. The end result is that important public priorities remain—and become increasingly—underfunded. This measure will provide accountability by requiring lawmakers to invest additional funds, during good economic times, into ...

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Is this a tax increase?

No. Because of a 25-year-old law, Colorado isn’t allowed to keep and spend all of the tax revenue it already collects. This measure will direct lawmakers to invest those funds into education, transportation, mental health and senior services over the next 10 years.

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If this measure passes, what prevents the legislature from reducing the amount they would have funded K12 education?

This ballot measure requires at least 35% of the additional revenue to be directed to education, including pre-school through 12th grade education, vocational education and higher education. As in every legislative session, the legislature has the ability to cut education in order to fund other areas of the state budget. However, the negative factor provides a mechanism for tracking those cuts and our advocates will be at the Capitol highlighting the shell game if that becomes an issue.

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If this measure passes, does that mean we’ve solving the funding shortfall?

No. However, passing this measure is an important step in allowing the state to restore vital funding to important public priorities during good economic times.  

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When will petitions become available?

You are invited to join one of the statewide events on Saturday, May 14, to pick up petitions and to learn more about a citizen ballot initiative—known as "Colorado Priorities."  The Colorado Priorities ballot measure will allow the state to keep all revenues collected under the current tax rates, and invest any additional revenue above the revenue cap into education, transportation, mental health services and senior services. It would be in effect for 10 years. This measure does not raise taxes—not one penny. This measure does not change or amend the Colorado ...

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What is the final language approved for the ballot initiative?

The Colorado Priorities ballot initiative states: Shall there be a change to the Colorado Revised Statutes authorizing the state to retain and spend state revenues that exceed the constitutional limitation on state fiscal year spending, and, in connection therewith, authorizing the state to retain and spend all such revenues collected during the ten fiscal years from July 1, 2016 through June 30, 2026; authorizing the state to annually retain and spend such revenues for any subsequent fiscal year in an amount equal to the highest amount collected in any single fiscal ...

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What are the next steps following the April 6 Title Board meeting?

There is a seven-day window where one can challenge the proposal. If challenged, a Motion for Rehearing is filed and it will then go back to the April 20 Title Board meeting for another hearing.

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What is the language set by the Title Board for the measures?

The Title Board met on April 6 and set title for the following three versions of the ballot measure: Measure #116 A change to the Colorado Revised Statutes permanently authorizing the state to retain and spend all state revenues that exceed the constitutional limitation on state fiscal year spending, and, in connection therewith, dedicating specified percentages of any revenues retained to fund education and transportation projects and allowing the state to use remaining revenues retained for the same purposes and to fund mental health services and senior service...

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What is the difference between the multiple proposals filed?

There have been five initiatives filed in order to place a measure on the November ballot. Multiple versions have been filed in order to ensure we are able to begin collecting signatures in May. Permanently allow the state to keep revenue beyond the current limit and specify where additional monies must be spent:    at least 35% of any additional funds must be spent on education and at least another 35% must be spent on transportation, and any funds not spent on for those two purposes can only be spent on senior services and mental health. Temporarily allow the ...

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Three proposals from Ritchie and former Colorado State University President Al Yates were filed to allow the state to keep any revenue that comes in over the state's revenue cap and to invest it in areas such as, preschool through 12th-grade education, vocational education, higher education, highways, bridges, mass transit, mental-health services and senior services. Two of the three proposals would allow this only through 2026, while a third would allow it permanently. Only one of the three will make it to the ballot box in November. Multiple proposals were filed to ...